Umami Burger

At first glance, Umami Burger looks like a local vintage bookstore, nestled in Downtown Palo Alto, however upon further inspection one whiffs the aroma of delicious food wafting from the open doorway and realizes that it is in fact, a restaurant. 

Upon being seated I noticed the decor, the wooden tables and chairs reminiscent of a collegiate library, and the rows upon rows of bookshelves that create a cozy atmosphere, which is quite the stark contrast from the bustle and chatter of those impatiently waiting in line for Sushiritto a few feet away. 

Umami Burger at a slower time of day. Busiest during lunch hour and 6pm onwards.

Umami Burger at a slower time of day. Busiest during lunch hour and 6pm onwards.

The restaurant embraces the roots and culture of technology in Palo Alto. Hidden within the artwork on the walls is Steve Jobs on the cover of Macworld and an illustration of an old Apple computer along with California redwoods and engineering diagrams.

Art at Umami

Art at Umami

I was pleasantly surprised when I took a look at the menu and was greeted with a plethora of burger options, all of which I wanted to try. In the end, I settled upon the “Greenbird”, a healthier option consisting of a turkey patty, crushed avocado, green cheese, butter lettuce, and sprouta. On other occasions I tried the “Cali”, a more traditional burger that was delicious as well, and the “Ahi Tuna”, which tasted quite like tuna tartare on a bun, it was rather delectable.

Menu

Menu

Soon the burger arrived, and yes that is the Umami Burger logo on the bun. I first attempted to eat the burger with my hands, but heads up the succulent patty and messy sauce make this very difficult, this is a burger that is meant to be eaten with a fork and a knife. Once I realized how the burger was supposed to be consumed I was able to enjoy it’s distinct flavors. 

If you’re in the area and looking for a filling meal and not too long of a wait, Umami Burger is a great choice. 

   Artsy Level: 3.5

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     I find that these days teenagers and young adults increasingly value ‘artsiness’ in their photos, meals, and everyday objects. I believe ‘artsiness’ refers how unique something is, how well it’s designed, and how it appeals to the human eye and sense of emotion. Individuals often travel to restaurants or locations to enjoy the ambiance of ‘artsiness’ amongst other elements, and thus the artsy level ranking was born. If you’ve visited Umami, let me know what you think its artsy level should be in the comments below.